Sesquicentennial of Civil War Program Very Well Attended

This group of re-enactors from the Sgt. William A. Hamby Camp of Crossville, dressed in period attire, were on hand Saturday to help celebrate the Sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War with a special ceremony at the Fentress County Courthouse.  Pictured are: Dave Jones, Charles Ervin, Jack Looper, Charles Williams, Matt McClanahan, Tommy Phillips, Cody Bolin, Greg Davis, Jeremiah Clark, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Jeremiah Hassler.

This group of re-enactors from the Sgt. William A. Hamby Camp of Crossville, dressed in period attire, were on hand Saturday to help celebrate the Sesquicentennial of the end of the Civil War with a special ceremony at the Fentress County Courthouse. Pictured are: Dave Jones, Charles Ervin, Jack Looper, Charles Williams, Matt McClanahan, Tommy Phillips, Cody Bolin, Greg Davis, Jeremiah Clark, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Jeremiah Hassler.

Fentress County observed the Sesquicentennial (150th Anniversary) of the end of the Civil War on Saturday, April 25 with a special ceremony at the Fentress County Courthouse.

The event had originally been planned to start with a walking parade on Main Street from Union Bank to the Courthouse, but the threat of rain forced the parade to be cancelled, but it was nevertheless a well attended and very moving ceremony.

Several re-enactors entered the courtroom, with “soldiers” from both the Union and Confederate Armies standing at attention in the front of the courtroom during the ceremony.

The American Legion Post 137 Honor Guard presented the Colors, the Pledge to the Flag was led by Veterans Service Officer Jeff Tinch, and the National Anthem was sung by Glenda Jennings.

County Executive Michael Cross then addressed the nearly packed courtroom, noting that the Civil War had broken and splintered the nation, particularly in this area, where families were divided, and even brother fighting against brother.   “This is the solemn realization of what happens when a nation is splintered. This day we give honor and remember the importance to the Civil War and what can happen when a nation is divided.  Hopefully, this will never happen again.” He expressed his appreciation to all those who had made the event possible, to preserve the history and memory of those who had served.

Jamestown Mayor Ryan Smith also addressed the gathering, echoing Executive’s comments, and emphasized the fact that the Civil War served to reunite a splintered nation, whose constitution was based on the foundation that all men are created equal and every citizen is endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, among those are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Read the rest of the story in this weeks Fentress Courier.