March Is Extension Month In Tennessee

Looking on as County Executive J. Michael Cross proclaims March as Extension Month are, left to right:  John Gunter, Fentress County Extension Agenc; Christie Tinch, Administrative Assistant Amanda Hicks, Delores Taylor, Sarah Upchurch, and Cathy Potter.

Looking on as County Executive J. Michael Cross proclaims March as Extension Month are, left to right: John Gunter, Fentress County Extension Agenc; Christie Tinch, Administrative Assistant Amanda Hicks, Delores Taylor, Sarah Upchurch, and Cathy Potter.

March is Extension Month in Tennessee. Extension is a national educational program supported by USDA through the nation’s land-grant universities and administered with funding from state and local governments in Tennessee through offices in each of the state’s 95 counties.

County Extension offices across the state are planning various celebrations and commemorations for the state’s 105-year-old Extension program.

Locally, in cooperation with The University of Tennessee and TSU, on Monday, March 16, County Executive J. Michael Cross issued a proclamation, designating the month of March as UT Extension Month in Fentress County.

Extension is the outreach arm of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and the Tennessee State University College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Sciences. An integral part of the land-grant mission, Extension programs are delivered in all 95 counties in the state by subject-matter specialists, county agents and volunteers.

“Extension means ‘reaching out,’ and University of Tennessee Extension extends the university’s teaching and research missions to deliver research-based information and education to all the state’s citizens through youth and adult programs in every county,” said Tim Cross, dean of UT Extension.

Example programs available through county offices include the state’s award-winning 4-H Youth Development Program including its summer youth camps; family and consumer educational programs; and healthy living courses. In keeping with the traditional view of Extension, information to assist the state’s agricultural producers and foresters is also available, and the increasingly popular courses for Master Gardeners, and gardeners in general, are also conducted through county Extension offices.

Read the rest of the story in this weeks Fentress Courier.